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Springfield, IL – State Representative David McSweeney (R-Barrington Hills) today filed legislation to protect students from predatory educators and ensure accusations against educators are managed properly with the best interests of students in mind. House Bill 5914 makes numerous changes in state law to address the flaws and gaps in legislation and policy that led to Chicago Public School’s gross mishandling of sexual abuse and assault cases that occurred at schools within the district.

“The mistakes made by the schools in Chicago are reprehensible; nothing like this should ever be allowed to happen again,” Rep. McSweeney said. “These cases were handled atrociously by CPS and they were allowed to get away with it because of shortcomings in state law. The Chicago Tribune’s investigation unveiled that while this is a significant issue in Chicago, this is also a statewide problem.”

A Chicago Tribune investigation identified 72 school employees as alleged perpetrators in the last decade in schools all across Chicago. They found that CPS conducted shoddy background checks, which led to the hiring of educators with red flags in their records, several of whom went on to commit abuses at CPS schools. Among those that left CPS after being investigated, several were rehired elsewhere. 

HB 5914 mandates that the Illinois State Board of Education must be aware of, and monitor, the process with regard to each individual background check conducted by school districts. It also amends the Freedom of Information Act to allow school districts to disclose the disciplinary records of school district personnel relating to sexual abuse. It further allows a school district to divulge internal investigative findings and discipline to another school district. Any arresting agency is required to share its reports pertaining to the arrest of a licensed educator with the superintendent of any school district that employs the educator.

In addition, the Tribune’s investigation found significant failures in the way individual schools and the overall district handled cases of sexual abuse. CPS admitted that they do not have a standard protocol for investigating reports of sexual misconduct. HB 5914 will require school boards to report all credible cases of sexual assault or abuse by a licensed educator to the State Board of Education, to establish a hearing procedure for student victims, and to ensure that a licensed educator under investigation by the State Superintendent of Education is reassigned to non-classroom duty. 

Modeled off a Florida law, the bill would also make it a criminal offense for an authority figure to engage in sexual conduct or sexual relations with a student, regardless of age.

“This isn’t just on CPS, these failures exist in state government as well and need to be fixed as soon as possible,” Rep. McSweeney continued. “This comprehensive legislation is a solid start and a good base that we can amend as further policy recommendations are given or more legislative gaps come to light.”

The bill was drafted by Rep. McSweeney and State Senator Tom Cullerton (D-Villa Park). State Representative Mary Flowers (D-Chicago) is the chief co-sponsor in the Illinois House.
Chicago Sun Times Editorial Board:
If Illinois’ government is going to keep burning money in a garbage can, as one lawmaker puts it, it should at least keep track of how much that’s costing us.

The wasted money — literally over a billion dollars — is cash the state shells out for high interest on overdue bills. Keeping track of that utterly wasted money is the idea behind a House bill that passed unanimously Monday. The bill would require future governors to stop ignoring how much late-payment interest is costing the state each year when they submit their annual proposed budgets.

This is a bill that absolutely should become law.

State Journal-Register Editorial Board:
The House has already taken steps to address this issue by approving House Bill 5814, which if signed into law would require governors to identify and account for the cost of late payment interest penalties in their budget proposals. The idea behind requiring the governor to start with it, according to Mendoza’s office, is that the budget starts with the governor and if it’s included in the first step, legislators can be pressured into following suit.

This shouldn’t be a partisan matter. We are encouraged that the House vote of 101-0 indicates that chamber did not see it as such. It was sponsored by Rep. David McSweeney, R-Barrington Hills, in the House and Sen. Tom Cullerton, D-Villa Park, in the Senate, which gives us hope that legislators can agree on common sense, good-government measures regardless of what letter follows their name.


Better budgeting practices can only help the future. But we can learn from the mistakes of the past. We look forward to this becoming law — and soon.
From the NW Herald:

A proposed bill sponsored by State Rep. David McSweeney that could give township boards in McHenry County the power to put a consolidation referendum on an election ballot with a majority vote passed committee Monday in Springfield and now will go to the House floor.

...If signed into law, HB 4637 would allow voters to force a referendum onto an election ballot with a petition signed by 5 percent of voters from a previous comparable election. For example, if 5,000 people voted in Algonquin Township in the last election, a petition carrying 250 signatures would put a question on the ballot asking voters whether they want to eliminate the township.

If 50 percent of voters support elimination at the polls, the township would be dissolved within 90 days after the election. All property, personnel, contractual obligations and liabilities inside the township then would transfer to McHenry County.
House Bill 5849 aims to give law enforcement a mechanism to pursue people deemed a danger to themselves and others, and House Bill 5847 establishes that murder committed as a result of the intentional discharge of a firearm is an aggravating factor in first degree murder sentencing.


House Bill 5849 allows a circuit court to issue a warrant to search for and seize a firearm in the possession of a person who is deemed a danger to themselves or to others under certain conditions.

"We need to give law enforcement agencies the tools they need to help prevent potentially dangerous individuals from the unnecessary risk of harm to themselves or others with a firearm," McSweeney said. "We can do that while maintaining a respect for an individual’s Second Amendment rights and that is exactly what my legislation does.”

Read more about the bills at the NW Herald
From the NW Herald

"The Illinois House has adopted a bill from the desk of state Rep. David McSweeney that amends the Local Records Act to require public bodies to disclose information about severance agreements tied to sexual harassment or discrimination.

The Barrington Hills Republican filed the bill after news reports that the Des Plaines Elementary School District 62 Board voted to pay then-Superintendent Floyd Williams a severance package after he was accused of sexually harassing employees.

...House Bill 4242 requires local governments, school districts, community college districts or other local taxing bodies to publish information about severance agreements with employees or contractors who have engaged in sexual harassment or sexual discrimination."